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Items filtered by date: September 2021

Tuesday, 28 September 2021 00:00

Peripheral Artery Disease Explained

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a medical condition that can cause poor circulation in the lower limbs. This occurs due to a buildup of fatty plaques in the arteries that supply the lower limbs. The plaque causes arteries to narrow and harden, making it more difficult for blood to travel through them and bring oxygen and nutrients to the feet and ankles. In its early stages, PAD may be asymptomatic. As it progresses, symptoms can include foot and leg cramps, numbness, weakness, coldness, skin discoloration, hair loss, and slow-healing sores and wounds on the lower limbs. Your podiatrist can screen you for PAD through a variety of simple, noninvasive tests. If you suspect that you may have PAD, or if you are an older adult or have a family history of vascular disease, it is suggested that you visit a podiatrist for a PAD screening. 

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Dwayne A. Lay, DPM from Elite Foot and Ankle. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Canton, GA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 21 September 2021 00:00

Types of Foot Blisters

Blisters are fluid-filled bubbles of skin that can form anywhere on the body.  Most blisters on the feet and toes are caused by friction from shoes or socks rubbing repeatedly over a concentrated area of skin. The top layer of skin separates from the layers of skin underneath it and the empty space fills with a fluid called serum or plasma. The fluid cushions and protects the raw skin underneath the blister.  Most blisters are clear and filled with serum. Sometimes, a blister can appear red or black. This is indicative of blood vessel damage, in addition to skin damage. Infected blisters may have a white or yellow tinge due to pus forming and collecting beneath the blister. Most blisters heal on their own, but if you have a blister that appears to be infected, it is strongly suggested that you see a podiatrist for treatment.  

Blisters may appear as a single bubble or in a cluster. They can cause a lot of pain and may be filled with pus, blood, or watery serum. If your feet are hurting, contact Dwayne A. Lay, DPM of Elite Foot and Ankle. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Foot Blisters

Foot blisters are often the result of friction. This happens due to the constant rubbing from shoes, which can lead to pain.

What Are Foot Blisters?

A foot blister is a small fluid-filled pocket that forms on the upper-most layer of the skin. Blisters are filled with clear fluid and can lead to blood drainage or pus if the area becomes infected.

Symptoms

(Blister symptoms may vary depending on what is causing them)

  • Bubble of skin filled with fluid
  • Redness
  • Moderate to severe pain
  • Itching

Prevention & Treatment

In order to prevent blisters, you should be sure to wear comfortable shoes with socks that cushion your feet and absorb sweat. Breaking a blister open may increase your chances of developing an infection. However, if your blister breaks, you should wash the area with soap and water immediately and then apply a bandage to the affected area. If your blisters cause severe pain it is important that you call your podiatrist right away.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Canton, GA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 14 September 2021 00:00

Where Does Achilles Tendonitis Develop?

Achilles tendonitis is a common injury to the Achilles tendon which is a strong, fibrous band of tissue which connects the calf muscles to the heel bone at the back of the lower leg. There are two places along the Achilles tendon where someone might develop Achilles tendonitis. Insertional Achilles tendonitis occurs at the bottom of the heel, where the tendon attaches to the heel bone. This type of tendonitis can happen to both athletes and those who live a sedentary lifestyle. It is often accompanied by heel spurs, which can make the tendonitis worse. Non-insertional Achilles tendonitis occurs in the middle of the tendon, approximately 2-4 cm above the ankle. This type of tendonitis is more common in athletes and young people. If you are suffering from Achilles tendon pain or stiffness, please seek the care of a podiatrist. This professional can determine the type of Achilles tendonitis you have and find the right treatment for you. 

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dwayne A. Lay, DPM of Elite Foot and Ankle. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Canton, GA . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 13 September 2021 00:00

Are You Suffering From Ingrown Toenails?

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to more serious concerns, such as an infection. Knowing proper nail care can help in the prevention of an ingrown toenail. Give us a call, and get treated!

Tuesday, 07 September 2021 00:00

High Heel Side Effects

High heels may be stylish, but unfortunately they are not ideal for the health of your feet or ankles. Frequently wearing high heels can lead to sore calves, foot pain, weakened ligaments, and deformed toes. These problems are magnified if the shoes are also ill-fitting, too tight, unsupportive, or have a narrow toe box. High heels may also increase your risk of incurring an ankle sprain or falling. Further up in the body, wearing high heels may lead to knee pain, lower back pain, and changes to your posture over time. Even with the risks mentioned, if you don’t want to permanently ban high heels from your shoe closet there are things you can do to lower your chances of foot pain, deformity, and injury. Wear high heels less frequently, choose shoes that fit properly and have a wide low heel, as well as plenty of room in the toe area to wiggle your toes. For more information about the relationship between footwear and proper foot health, please consult with a podiatrist.

High heels have a history of causing foot and ankle problems. If you have any concerns about your feet or ankles, contact Dwayne A. Lay, DPM from Elite Foot and Ankle. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Effects of High Heels on the Feet

High heels are popular shoes among women because of their many styles and societal appeal.  Despite this, high heels can still cause many health problems if worn too frequently.

Which Parts of My Body Will Be Affected by High Heels?

  • Ankle Joints
  • Achilles Tendon – May shorten and stiffen with prolonged wear
  • Balls of the Feet
  • Knees – Heels cause the knees to bend constantly, creating stress on them
  • Back – They decrease the spine’s ability to absorb shock, which may lead to back pain.  The vertebrae of the lower back may compress.

What Kinds of Foot Problems Can Develop from Wearing High Heels?

  • Corns
  • Calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Morton’s Neuroma
  • Plantar Fasciitis

How Can I Still Wear High Heels and Maintain Foot Health?

If you want to wear high heeled shoes, make sure that you are not wearing them every day, as this will help prevent long term physical problems.  Try wearing thicker heels as opposed to stilettos to distribute weight more evenly across the feet.  Always make sure you are wearing the proper shoes for the right occasion, such as sneakers for exercising.  If you walk to work, try carrying your heels with you and changing into them once you arrive at work.  Adding inserts to your heels can help cushion your feet and absorb shock. Full foot inserts or metatarsal pads are available. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Canton, GA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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